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China and Biofuels - Stir-Fry or Fly? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:00

China's omnivorous global appetite for energy resources is well known.

While biofuel production is one of the rising energy stars of the 21st century, it is unlikely to become a significant source for China in the near future, as the country's arable land is devoted first and foremost to feeding the country's massive population 1.3 billion citizens, unless a feedstock can be found that grows well on marginal land.

But the issue of food may yet prove to contribute to the country's energy output by recycling a traditional component of Chinese cuisine - used cooking oil.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:05
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Could algae-based biodiesel be the fuel source of the future? PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 29 August 2011 23:58

By Erin Steele, Peace River Record-Gazette

Change – when looking at the world as a whole – happens when it becomes necessary. The specific route of that change springs from the possibility of that route being viable. Taking into account these two factors, it is time for us as Albertans, Canadians and citizens of the Planet Earth to begin the shift from our dependency on fossil fuels to a renewable, biodegradable biodiesel that will sustain future generations and allow them the same standard of living we enjoy, potentially until the end of time.

We need to begin the shift by researching the best technology and means of creating biodiesel to make it most adaptable with our vehicles; it needs to be created as suitable for mass-production; governments should provide financial incentives to people to tweak their vehicles for accepting biodiesel; players of the stock market should start investing in renewable energies, as it is the inevitable way of the future. Most importantly we need to begin to seriously think of oil extraction as a temporary resource and ensure that by the time it runs out – and it will, whether 50 or 100 years from now – we are ready to keep up our standard of living through a seamless transition to a renewable fuel.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:06
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Mo. sees profit from pond scum as biodiesel source PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 29 August 2011 23:55

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Say "biofuel," and most people think "ethanol." But someday they might think "algae-diesel." And if they do, Missouri is likely to have helped make it happen.

The idea of turning algae, also known as pond scum, into diesel fuel may seem far-fetched. But Missouri is already a leader in the research and development of different strains of algae that produce oil, similar to vegetable oil, that can be used as biodiesel fuel.

And a new study is expected to say what was once unexpected — that Missouri would be a good place to produce the algae.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:06
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Biofuel from algae grown in wastewater PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Monday, 29 August 2011 23:43
Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) - 17 February 2011

Let algae do the dirty work. Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are developing biodiesel from microalgae grown in wastewater. The project is doubly “green” because algae consume nitrates and phosphates and reduce bacteria and toxins in the water. The end result: clean wastewater and stock for a promising biofuel.

The purified wastewater can be channeled back into receiving bodies of water at treatment plants, while the biodiesel can fuel buses, construction vehicles and farm equipment. Algae could replace diesel’s telltale black puffs of exhaust with cleaner emissions low in the sulfur and particulates that accompany fossil fuels.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:06
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